Sobering Statistics

  • Approximately one-third of all traffic crash fatalities in the United States involve drunk drivers (with blood alcohol concentrations [BACs] at or above .08). In 2018, there were 10,511 people killed in drunk-driving crashes. To put it in perspective, that’s equal to about 20 jumbo jets crashing, with no survivors. 

  • Nationally, it is illegal to drive with a BAC of .08 or higher — no exceptions.

  • Of the traffic fatalities in 2018 among children 14 and younger, 22% (231) occurred in alcohol-impaired-driving crashes.

  • Despite the fact that it’s illegal to drive when impaired by alcohol, in 2018, one person was killed every 50 minutes by a drunk driver on our nation’s roads.

  • Men are more likely than women to be driving drunk when involved in fatal crashes. In 2018, 21% of males were drunk, compared to 14% of females.

  • In 2018, motorcycle riders involved in fatal crashes had higher percentages of alcohol impairment than any other type of motor vehicle driver (25% for motorcycle riders, 21% for passenger car drivers, 19% for light-truck drivers, and 3% for drivers of large trucks).

 

The Cost of Drunk Driving

  • On average, a DUI can set you back $10,000 in attorney’s fees, fines, court costs, lost time at work, higher insurance rates, car towing, and more.

  • The financial impact from impaired-driving crashes is devastating. Based on 2010 numbers (the most recent year for which cost data is available), impaired-driving crashes cost the United States $44 billion annually.

  • If you’re caught drinking and driving, you can face jail time. Imagine trying to explain that to your friends and family or your place of employment.

  • Drinking and driving can cause you to lose your driver’s license and your vehicle. This could inhibit you from getting to work, resulting in lost wages and, potentially, job loss.

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©2020 by Police Traffic Officers Association of Bergen County